Filet Mignon

August 13 is National Filet Mignon Day. Celebrate this tasty holiday with Filet Mignon with Herb Butter Sauce and Mushrooms on the EGG!

Recipe adapted from the Georgia Beef Board. For more information about Georgia Beef, visit Gabeef.com.

Ingredients

  • 4 beef Tenderloin Steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 6 ounces each)
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 11⁄2 cups assorted mushrooms (shiitake, enoki, straw, cremini, button or chanterelle), whole or cut in half if large
  • 1⁄4 cup minced shallots
  • 11⁄2 cups beef broth
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or 1⁄4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon water

Instructions

Set the EGG to direct cooking 600°F/316°C.

Cook steaks 2 minutes, flip, cook 2 more minutes, then flip one last time and cook for 2 additional minutes. Check internal temperature with food thermometer for doneness. Remove to platter, season with salt and pepper, as desired. Keep warm.

Set the EGG to indirect cooking at 350°F/177°C.

In a Stir Fry and Paella Pan, heat butter until melted. Add mushrooms and shallots; cook and stir 3 to 5 minutes or until mushrooms are tender and browned. Add beef broth and thyme to pan, stirring until browned bits attached to bottom of pan are dissolved; bring to a boil. Combine cornstarch and water in small bowl; stir into mushroom mixture. Cook 2 minutes or until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, as desired.

Serve steaks with sauce.

Makes 4 servings.

3 thoughts on “Filet Mignon

  1. Because the muscle is not weight-bearing, it contains less connective tissue, which makes it tender. Traditional cooking calls for the filet mignon to be seared on each side using intense heat for a short time and then transferred to a lower heat to cook the meat all the way through.

  2. I recently grilled 1 1/2″ (4 oz.) filet mignon steaks on our BGE, 1 minute on each side at 600F. I had brought them to room temperature and sprinkled them with pepper prior to grilling, and after turning them applied some herb butter. There was a bit of flare-up from the butter but the steaks did not char, and they had cooked to medium when we cut into them. I cooked this part of the meal last, and they rested for 5-10 minutes while we staged everything else. However we all noticed that they were chewy – not dry, but not buttery-tender as we expected from this cut. I had purchased a whole grass-fed tenderloin, so I don’t know if the animal itself was a factor or if I did something wrong. I did remove the connective tissue while carving up the roast, but this was my first attempt so any tips on cooking the rest of the steaks (on the grill or otherwise) would be appreciated.

    1. Terry

      My experience with Grass Fed Beef is that it is generally a tougher eating muscle than Prime or Choice meets from the butcher.

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